Difference between revisions of "Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure"

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'''''Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure''''', also known as '''''Crash Bandicoot XS''''' <small>(a shortening of "extra small")</small> in Europe, is a platform game released for the [[Game Boy Advance]] in 2002. It was developed by [[Vicarious Visions]] and published by [[Universal Interactive]] in North America, Europe, and Australia and [[Konami]] in Japan. It is the first ''[[Crash Bandicoot (franchise)|Crash Bandicoot]]'' game that was released for a handheld, excluding [[Tiger Electronics]]' [[Crash Bandicoot (99x Games)|99x Games]] from the 1990s. Since its release, ''Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure'' has been included on some [[Crash Superpack]] carts.
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'''''Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure''''', also known as '''''Crash Bandicoot XS''''' <small>(a shortening of "extra small")</small> in Europe, is a platform game released for the [[Game Boy Advance]] in 2002. It was developed by [[Vicarious Visions]] and published by [[Universal Interactive]] in North America, Europe, and Australia and [[Konami]] in Japan. It is the first ''[[Crash Bandicoot (franchise)|Crash Bandicoot]]'' game that was released for a handheld, excluding [[Tiger Electronics]]' [[Crash Bandicoot (99x Games)|99x Games]] from the 1990s. Since its release, ''Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure'' has been included on some [[Crash Superpack]] carts. In 2003, the game received a direct sequel, ''[[Crash Bandicoot 2: N-Tranced]]''.
  
 
==Story==
 
==Story==

Revision as of 06:58, 25 March 2020

Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure
Crash Bandicoot THA cover.jpg
Developer(s) Vicarious Visions
Publisher Universal Interactive
Konami (Japan)
Release date(s) USA February 25, 2002
Europe March 15, 2002
Japan July 18, 2002
Genre(s) Platformer
Console(s) Game Boy Advance
Mode(s) Single player
Media Cartridge

This article is under construction. Therefore, please excuse its informal appearance while it's being worked on. We hope to have it completed as soon as possible.

Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure, also known as Crash Bandicoot XS (a shortening of "extra small") in Europe, is a platform game released for the Game Boy Advance in 2002. It was developed by Vicarious Visions and published by Universal Interactive in North America, Europe, and Australia and Konami in Japan. It is the first Crash Bandicoot game that was released for a handheld, excluding Tiger Electronics' 99x Games from the 1990s. Since its release, Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure has been included on some Crash Superpack carts. In 2003, the game received a direct sequel, Crash Bandicoot 2: N-Tranced.

Story

Cortex holding Earth after he shrunk it with the Planetary Minimizer

In a Space Station orbiting Earth, Uka Uka is mad at Dr. Cortex for constantly failing at his evil plans. Cortex begs for mercy and explains that he wasted years of trying to get rid of Crash Bandicoot. Cortex dismisses Crash as unimportant and chooses to pursue a new and different goal—conquering Earth. Cortex tells Uka Uka that his plan is to shrink the entire planet.

Once Cortex completes the Planetary Minimizer, he uses it to shrink Earth to the size of a grapefruit. Dr. Cortex televises himself, taunting the entire planet and proclaiming himself as their new ruler. Aku informs Crash and Coco about the event and tells them that the planet needs their help. Coco figures out that Cortex is using crystals as the power source for the Planet Minimizer. Coco tells Crash to find the crystals so that she can try and make a device that returns Earth to its original size. Aku wishes luck to Crash as he begins his adventure.

Crash accesses the levels from portals within the Warp Areas. He encounters three of Cortex's henchmen along the way, Dingodile, N. Gin, and Tiny Tiger. Crash eventually reaches the Space Station, where he encounters Cortex. He tries to shrink Crash with the Planetary Minimizer, but Crash tricks Cortex into firing the colored gems that stabilize the machine. This causes the Planetary Minimizer to malfunction.

There are two endings for game. If Crash has not collected every gem and relic, the Planetary Minimizer breaks down but is not entirely destroyed. Coco uses all 20 crystals to power her machine, and meanwhile, as Earth returns to its original size, Crash rides a motorcycle-like vehicle in space and re-enters Earth. Back at home, Aku warns Crash that Cortex is still an active threat because the machine is not completely destroyed. In the 100% ending, the Planetary Minimizer is destroyed entirely, and its unrestrained effects fuse Cortex and the previous bosses into a single monster named Mega-Mix. Crash runs down the space station's hallway while being chased by Mega-Mix. Like the unfinished ending, Crash escapes from the Space Station on a motorcycle-like vehicle and returns to Earth on time, when Coco uses her machine to reverse its effects. The Space Station explodes, but Cortex and the other bosses escape in an escape pod as the text "The End?!" is shown on-screen.

Gameplay

Crash selects a level at the warp hub
Gameplay screenshot of Crash and Aku Aku in the first level, Jungle Jam.

Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure plays like a traditional 2D platformer, although some areas are in 2.5D. It plays similarly to the first three Crash Bandicoot games for the PlayStation.

The hub area, known as the warp hub, consists of four "Warp Areas", each with five normal levels and a boss fight. Warp Areas take place on yellow, circular platforms which levitate in the sky. Every level is accessed from their own portal, each numbered 1-5, from left to right. After completing a level, Crash unlocks a Time Trial mode for that level. The boss portal is unlocked when all five levels of the same Warp Area are completed. Instead of a number, boss portals depict an icon of the boss fought. When Crash defeats a boss for the first time, he unlocks the next Warp Area. In the warp hub, Crash is always standing on a circular stone platform, which moves him between the level portals. The stone platform can also move Crash up to the next Warp Area or back down to the previous one.

From the start, Crash can perform six basic moves, including Jump, Spin Attack, Slide, High Jump, Body Slam, and Crouch. After defeating a boss, Crash unlocks a Special Move, most of which are an enhancement over a basic move. Crash starts his adventure with five lives. He can earn another life by collecting 100 Wumpa Fruits or breaking open a Crash Crate and collecting the Crash head. If Crash breaks open an Aku Aku Crate, the Aku Aku is freed, and it follows alongside Crash. It gives Crash an extra hit point. If Crash breaks three Aku Aku Crates without losing Aku Aku, he is granted temporary invincibility.

The main collectible item are Crystals, and there are a total of 20, one for each level. Other collectible items are Clear Gems, Colored Gems, and Relics. A Clear Gem is awarded to Crash if he breaks every crate in a level or completes a secret area. Colored Gems are hidden within levels, usually in hard-to-reach locations. Crash is awarded a Relic if he completes a level in Time Trial mode. While Crash is standing on a level portal, an icon of him and the world boss are displayed at the top-left corner. The crystal, gem and relic icons to the right of the boss icon indicates that Crash has not yet obtained those items. Items to the right of Crash's icon are those that he already obtained.

Time Trial Mode

In "Time Trial" mode, Crash's objective is to race within the pre-designated time shown before he enters a level (the time beneath it is the player's best time). The Time Trial mode does not immediately start when Crash enters a level, and can be activated if Crash jumps at a golden stopwatch at the start of the level. This causes a timer to appear on the bottom-right corner of the screen. If Crash does not touch the stopwatch, he goes through the level as normal. In the mode, several Time Boxes are scattered throughout the level. They stop the timer for either 1–3 seconds, based on which number appears on the Time Box. If Crash completes a level quickly enough, he earns a colored relic—from longest to shortest time: Sapphire, Gold or Platinum.

Development

The game stemmed from an agreement between Universal Interactive Studios and Konami in September 2000. This allowed them to respectively develop and publish a Crash Bandicoot game for next-generation consoles, including the Game Boy Advance, and ended the Crash Bandicoot franchise's exclusivity to Sony consoles.[1]

Reception

Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure received generally favorable reviews from critics. The game was praised for its graphics and overall design, but critics also noted that the game had a lack of innovation.

Reviews
Reviewer, Publication Score Comment
Craig Harris, IGN 9/10 "There's no doubt that Universal Interactive gave Vicarious Visions a lengthy development cycle for Crash Bandicoot's first outing beyond a Sony game system -- the design on the Game Boy Advance is amazingly tight with solid controls and level design. And because the game offers different styles of gameplay throughout the adventure, The Big Adventure is a GBA game that doesn't get old quickly...and the inclusion of the Time Trial challenges and hidden gems makes the game even more challenging for players who are up to it. Crash Bandicoot's handheld debut is much recommended, and I can't wait to see what's next for this marsupial in future GBA installments...there's a lot more for this fuzzball to do on the portable."
Giancarlo Varanini, GameSpot 7.4/10 "Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure is a worthy addition to the series. For the most part, the controls are solid, and the graphics--while lacking a little variety--are done very well on the Game Boy Advance hardware. But ultimately, The Huge Adventure is a fairly basic platformer that doesn't really have some of the innovation of other Game Boy Advance platformers. Still, if you're willing to give Crash a try, its 20 levels as well as its time attack and gem-collecting modes should give you a solid gaming experience."
Scott Osborne, GameSpy 86/100 "Crash Bandicoot: The Huge Adventure won't wow you with anything really new, but if you want a traditional platformer done right, this is definitely one to play."
Aggregators
Compiler Platform / Score
Metacritic 78

References

  1. Bandicoot Crashes the Game Boy Advance. IGN. Published September 22, 2000.